Sean Casey

Your member of parliament for


Charlottetown

Sean Casey

Your member of parliament for


Charlottetown

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Budget 2019: Seniors

WHAT IS IN IT FOR SENIORS?

  • $1.76 billion over four years beginning in 2020-2021, to extend the GIS earnings exemption to self-employment income and to enhance it significantly, which will provide higher take-home pay for low-income working seniors and supporting their social inclusion.
  • Amendments to the Canada Pension Plan Act, to allow for the proactive enrollment of Canada Pension Plan contributors age 70 and over that have not yet applied to receive their retirement pension. These amendments will ensure that all seniors currently age 70 and over, and those turning 70 in 2020, will receive the full value of benefits to which they contributed.
  • $100 million over five years, starting in 2019-20 and $20 million per year ongoing, to top-up the New Horizons for Seniors program, which will support additional projects to improve the quality of life for vulnerable seniors and promote their full participation in Canadian society.
  •  New measures to better protect workplace pensions in the event of corporate insolvency.
  • $50 million over 5 years, starting in 2019-20, to support the implementation of Canada’s first National Dementia Strategy.
  • $35 million in 2019-20 to support First Nations seniors and people with disabilities on reserve maintain their independence and stay in their homes and communities close to their families through the Assisted Living Program.
  • $8.5 million over two years, starting in 2019-20, to engage with First Nations and Inuit communities on the development of a long-term care strategy.

PREVIOUS MEASURES

  • The Government appointed a Minister of Seniors to help the Government better understand the needs of Canadian seniors and ensure that programs and services are designed to respond to those needs.
  • Increased the Guaranteed Income Supplement top-up for single seniors. In Budget 2016, the Government increased the Guaranteed Income Supplement top-up by up to $947 per year for single seniors, boosting benefits for nearly 900,000 low-income seniors and lifting 57,000 seniors out of poverty.
  • Restored the eligibility age for Old Age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement benefits to 65.
  • In Budget 2016, the Government reduced the eligibility age for Old Age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement benefits from 65 to 67.
  • In Budget 2016, the Government introduced legislative changes so that couples who receive Guaranteed Income Supplement and Allowance benefits and have to live apart for reasons beyond their control can receive higher benefits based on their individual incomes.
  • In November 2017, the Government launched a $40 billion, 10-year plan which will help ensure that vulnerable Canadians, including low-income seniors, have access to housing that meets their needs and that they can afford.

Home care

The Government is providing $6 billion over 10 years to allow provinces and territories to improve access to home, community and palliative care services.

Enabling Accessibility Fund

The Government provided additional funding of $4 million in Budget 2016 and $77 million in Budget 2017 to improve the safety and accessibility of community spaces.

Employment Insurance caregiving benefit

The Government is making it easier to apply for Employment Insurance caregiving benefits and introduced a new benefit of up to 15 weeks in Budget 2017 to support individuals who are providing care to an elderly family member who requires significant support in order to recover from critical illness or injury.

Community-based approach to dementia

Budget 2018 committed $20 million over 5 years, and $4 million per year ongoing, to support community-based projects that enhance the wellbeing of people living with dementia, with particular focus on senior women.